A Gentleman’s Guide to Basic Necktie Knots

Greetings Barbarians! Long days and pleasant nights!

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Last September, I reached my first milestone in Patreon. I have gathered the aid of 10 willing patrons that made blogging my primary source of income. It is not much to consider as a livable income, but it sure helps in sending my kid to school. Providing high-quality content has always been my primary goal. Now that I am making some money on Patreon, it is time to fulfill that promise. Last month, I bought a pair of neckties to write about it. But why write about neckties?

Red for serious bussiness
Blue for fun

In our casual culture, hoodies and sneakers are deemed proper attire even for industry leaders. Do not get me wrong – I love a cool hoodie and an even cooler pair of sneakers. Neckties and the art of tying a necktie are now, suffice to say, a bit outdated. But it becomes an art form as well as a skill. Occasions like funerals, job interviews, and weddings still call for a sharp necktie. And believe me, you will be on those occasions a lot when you reach a particular age. You would not want to be the grown-ass man that asks his mom to tie his tie for him, right?

Today, I would be teaching a few basic Necktie knots and a primer on how to use them. 

The Four-in-hand 

The Four-in-hand Knot

It is also referred to as the “schoolboy” due to its simplicity. The Four-in-hand tie is the most used knot because it is straightforward. It is an excellent starting point to learn about neckties. Use the Four-in-hand for neckties made of heavy fabric. It looks great if you have slender neck features or a narrow collar spread.

1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside, extend the wider end about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wider end over the narrow end. 
1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside, extend the wider end about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wider end over the narrow end.
2. Turn the broad end back beneath the narrow end.
2. Turn the broad end back beneath the narrow end.
3. Again, cross the broad end over the narrow end.
3. Again, cross the broad end over the narrow end.
4. Pull the broad end back through the back loop.
4. Pull the broad end back through the back loop.
5. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
5. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
6. Slide the knot up to tighten. Center the knot.
6. Slide the knot up to tighten. Center the knot.
1.Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside, extend the wider end about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wider end over the narrow end. 
2. Turn the broad end back beneath the narrow end.
3. Again, cross the broad end over the narrow end.
4. Pull the broad end back through the back loop.
5. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
6. Slide the knot up to tighten. Center the knot. 

The Half-Windsor

The Half-Windsor Knot

The Full-Windsor’s little brother. You get the same triangle-shaped knot but not as bulky as the Full-Windsor. This knot is ideal for ties with lighter fabric and best worn with a standard collar. 

1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside, extend the wider end about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wider end over the narrow end.
1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside, extend the wider end about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wider end over the narrow end.
2. Turn the wider end back beneath the narrow end.
2. Turn the wider end back beneath the narrow end.
3. Pull the wider end back through the back loop.
3. Pull the wider end back through the back loop.
4. Bring the broad end across the front.
4. Bring the broad end across the front.
5, Pull the broad end back through the back loop.
5. Pull the broad end back through the back loop.
6. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
6. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
7. Slide the knot up to tighten. Center the knot.
7. Slide the knot up to tighten. Center the knot.
1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside, extend the wider end about 12 inches below the narrow end. Cross the wider end over the narrow end.
2. Turn the wider end back beneath the narrow end.
3. Pull the wider end back through the back loop.
4. Bring the broad end across the front.
5. Pull the broad end back through the back loop.
6. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
7. Slide the knot up to tighten. Center the knot.

The Full-Windsor

The Full-Windsor Knot

The most formal knot. It gives a broader triangle shape knot best worn with a wider spread collar or if you have fuller neck features. 

1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside. Cross the broad end over the narrow end and pull it up through the back.
1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside. Cross the broad end over the narrow end and pull it up through the back.
2. Pull the wider end towards the front and bring the broad end behind the narrow end.
2. Pull the wider end towards the front and bring the broad end behind the narrow end.
3. Pull the narrow end back through the loop this time, on the other side.
3. Pull the narrow end back through the loop this time, on the other side.
4. Bring the broad end across the front.
4. Bring the broad end across the front.
5. Pull the broad end up through the back loop.
5. Pull the broad end up through the back loop.
6. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
6. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
7. Slide the knot to tighten. Center the knot.
7. Slide the knot to tighten. Center the knot.
1. Drape the tie around your neck, seams inside. Cross the broad end over the narrow end and pull it up through the back.
2. Pull the wider end towards the front and bring the broad end behind the narrow end.
3. Pull the narrow end back through the loop this time, on the other side.
4. Bring the broad end across the front.
5. Pull the broad end up through the back loop.
6. Bring the broad end down through the front loop.
7. Slide the knot to tighten. Center the knot.

There you have it, three basic necktie knots at your disposal when you need to rise to the occasion. I hope that you find it useful. If you have any suggestions on what to write next, please comment below. I would love to hear about it.

Before we end, I would like to greet Jowa with a delightful birthday! I hope you like Frankenstein! Cheers to you, may you have more birthdays to come. I wish you all the love in the world.

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9 thoughts on “A Gentleman’s Guide to Basic Necktie Knots

Add yours

  1. My dad taught me how to tie the full Windsor knot…I had to learn how to tie necktie knots when I worked at Shoney’s (a restaurant), as all employee’s – male and female – wore neck ties. It was part of the dress code.

    Liked by 1 person

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